Wukan: Holding Steady

The latest on Wukan from a few sources:

First, Tom Lasseter continues to report from the scene-

Locals say that after they fought off a police advance on Dec. 11 and closed off the town to village security forces and Chinese Communist Party officials, government boats chased the fisherman from open waters into a harbor of the South China Sea. While there’s no blockade to be seen, the fear of the unknown is enough to keep most of the boats moored.

The government of the nearby city of Lufeng “is scared that we’ll buy weapons and bring them in,” said a 49-year-old fisherman surnamed Lin, who requested that his full name not be used for fear of reprisals.

Two other fishermen quickly offered a different theory: Officials don’t want people fleeing to Hong Kong and Taiwan across the sea.

It’s unclear whether the standoff will end with crackdown or negotiation.

Perhaps owing to those anxieties, a notice appeared Monday morning outside a house where many journalists are staying that asked them not to use the words “uprising” or “revolt” to describe the situation.

One member of the group, surnamed Shen, suggested unease about things going too far.

“We’re afraid that if we go to Lufeng the police will shoot us, or detain people and beat them to death,” said Shen, a short man in baggy black pants who also didn’t want his first name used.

Organizers have painted a less dramatic picture: If the police don’t allow the procession to pass, they’ll just stage a sit-in.

Shen said that despite his misgivings he’d probably join the march.

“I used to go out to the sea and fish, and then come back at noon and tend my family’s land,” he said. “But now I can’t fish and our land has been taken away.”

What, he asked, is there left for him to do?

Next, from RFA:

In a mass meeting on Monday, villagers made a collective decision to stage a demonstration on Wednesday and march to the city government, local sources said.

“Basically the whole village is there,” said a resident surnamed Chen on Monday. “There are maybe 6,000 or 7,000 people.”

“They are at the main intersection.”

Officials are now threatening that several thousand armed police officers now stationed in a cordon around the village, and carrying out identity checks on all those coming and leaving, are being readied for an assault on the village, according to Zhang.

An activist surnamed Yu, who traveled to Wukan in a show of solidarity with local residents, said he was detained after arriving at one of the road-blocks set up by armed police.

Yu, who traveled with a group of 10 others, said he was held from Dec. 8-16, before being escorted back home to the provincial capital, Guangzhou.

“I and a lot of other netizens are being confined to our homes,” Yu said. “We can’t go out.”

Guangzhou-based lawyer Tang Jingling was taken away by police at the weekend, his wife said.

“It’s probably to do with the Wukan incident,” said Tang’s wife, surnamed Wang. “I called up the police station to ask, and they told me that he was being held on orders from the Guangzhou municipal police department.”

A resident of Shangdaimei village, also near Shanwei city, said hundreds of villagers had marched to local government offices in Xinan township on Sunday to protest the sale of their farmland.

“There were some officials from the Communist Party commission for discipline inspection who said they would come to our village, but they never came,” said one protester, Lao Zhang.

“So we went to the township to protest … We were also protesting and calling for an allocation of land,” he said. “They should give it all back to the villagers.”

And finally, from Bloomberg:

Protesters in the Southern Chinese village of Wukan have organized to distribute food to the poor as a nine-day police blockade left people short of supplies.

People in the village in Guangdong province have not been allowed to get food from the outside and are donating remaining supplies to the poor, Huang Rongbiao, a restaurant owner in Wukan, said in a telephone interview yesterday. Villagers are allowed to come and go from Wukan as long as they don’t bring in food supplies, Huang said.

“Maybe there’s enough food for now but I can’t guess how long that will last,” said Huang, who has kept his restaurant closed for 10 days. “Hopefully, the government will handle this and we are waiting for news.”

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Filed under corruption, forced demolition, local governments, protests

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